BristolCon 2016

BristolCon, it’s been too long. Three years in fact, having missed the last two, and missed it badly. And to make this year’s event even more special for me, it marked my long-awaited (by me, if not the rest of the world!) debut as a panellist, discussing small presses.

Before that though, I had the ludicrously early start and the inevitably delayed train. It some ways the two and half hours away that I live is the worst possible distance: too far to be an easy journey on the day, but too close to easily justify staying at the hotel. It meant I arrived after the start of Sarah Pinborough’s kaffeeklatsch in The Snug, but sheepishly wedged myself in for an entertaining and informative talk.

I then went into a very crowded and humid Room Two, largely to scope out the venue and get into place for my panel that followed (I was pleased to find it had a microphone each, instead of the pass-the-kouchie communal one of FantasyCon). It was an interesting and lively panel, focusing on diversity, with Dev Agarwal on top form, and helped take my mind off my growing nerves.

The crowd thinned out for my panel, but I expected it with the line-up in Room One, and I wasn’t complaining. I had fellow Grimmies Sammy Smith and Joanne Hall either side of me, with Cheryl Morgan and Adrian Faulkner completing the line-up. It was nice atmosphere, and felt just like an informal chat between friends, who just happened to have microphones in front of them. Sitting alongside the very knowledgeable Cheryl Morgan was an education, and when I remembered the presence of the audience I extolled the creative freedom and family atmosphere of the small presses, and encouraged the support of Crowdfunder and Patreon campaigns to keep them going. I can’t remember what else, but the 50 minutes absolutely flew by.

I needed down time afterwards though, and found it at the Grimbold stand in the dealers’ room to enjoy seeing my name on a banner for the first time, and pick up signed books by Frances Kay, Joel Cornah and Steven Poore. Further relaxation came in the Lego Room where I took a tea break with Steven, audiobook narrator Di Croft, Jo Hall and Isha Crowe, who I’ve been wanting to meet for years after we went through Open University Creative Writing courses together and she went to the two BristolCons that I missed.

I then settled into Room One for an extended stay, starting with cookies and cake at Rob Harkess’s book launch and BristolCon favourites Juliet McKenna and eventually Gareth L Powell signing books for me, followed by Anna Smith-Spark and Dolly Garland starring in the Murderous Woman panel, Sarah Pinborough’s excellent Guest of Honour interview, and finally a panel on the practicalities of publishing which was capped by a brilliant reading from Sammy Smith.

I went back into Room 2 for one last panel before I had to get my train home, Fangorn being an engaging presence even when discussing monster poo, but I was already tiring by this time after a long day. I made my exit straight after, stopping to book my place for next year, when I might well book into the hotel, and to take the nameplate from my panel as a souvenir.

It was a great con and I’m already looking forward to the next, but I have to add a big thank you to Jo Hall, who’s stood down from organising this brilliant event after eight great years. It might not be the biggest convention out there, but it’s one the best.

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